The School of Arts & Sciences

Department of Social Sciences

Paul Tabar

Dr. Paul Tabar is a professor of sociology/anthropology at LAU Beirut. He is the Chair of Department of Humanities and the Acting Associate Chair of Department of Social Sciences in Beirut. He is also the director of LAU’s Institute for Migration Studies. He is an adjunct fellow at the Centre for Culture and Society, University of Western Sydney.

He is the author of “‘Political Remittances’: the case of Lebanese expatriates voting in national elections”. Journal of Intercultural Studies, Vol. 35, Issue 4, 2014 and of Arab Communities in Australia (CAUS, 2013, in Arabic).

He is also a co-author of Being Lebanese in Australia: Identity, racism and the ethnic field (Institute for Migration Studies, 2010), Bin Laden in the Suburbs: Criminilising the Arab Other (The Institute of Criminology, Sydney University, 2004), and has published many articles on Lebanese and Arab migrants in international journals. He is currently co-authoring a book on Ethnic Habitus.

His research interests include: Migration, Diasporic relations, multiculturalism, racism, home-grown terrorism, Lebanese state and society

Selected publications

  1. Poynting,S., Noble,G., Tabar, P., and Collins, J. (2004). Bin Laden in the Suburbs: Criminalising the Arab Other. Syndney Institute of Criminology. You can access a soft copy of the book here
  2. Tabar, P. (2014) “‘Political Remittances’: the case of Lebanese expatriates voting in national elections”. Journal of Intercultural Studies, Vol. 35, Issue 4.
  3. Tabar, P. (2013) Arab Communities in Australia (CAUS, 2014, in Arabic)
  4. Tabar, P., Noble, G. and Poynting, S. (2010) Being Lebanese in Australia: Identity, racism and the ethnic field (Institute for Migration Studies). You can access a soft copy of the book here
  5. Tabar, P. (2009) ‘Cronulla Riots: Community Leadership, Generational and Class Conflicts.’ in Greg Noble (ed) Lines in the Sand: The Cronulla Riots and the Limits of Australian Multiculturalism. Sydney Institute of Criminology Press.
  6. Poynting, S., Tabar, P. and Noble, G. (2009) ‘Looking for Respect: Lebanese Immigrant Young Men in Australia.’ in R. Howson, M. Donaldson, R. Hibbins and B. Pease (eds.) Migrant Masculinities: Critical Studies of Men and the Migration Experience. New York: Routledge.
  7. Salamey, I. and Tabar, P. (2008) ‘Consociational Democracy and Urban Sustainability: Transforming the Confessional Divides in Beirut.’ Ethnopolitics, 7:2, 239-263.
  8. Tabar, P. (2007) “‘Habiibs’ in Australia: Language, Identity and Masculinity.” Journal of Intercultural Studies, vol. 28, no. 2, May 2007, pp. 157-172.
  9. Tabar, P. (2006) ‘The Maronite Church in Lebanon: From Nation-Building to a Diasporan/Transnational Institution.’ in Francoise de Bel-Air (ed) Migration et Politique au Moyent-Orient. Institut Francais du Proche-Orient, Beirut, Lebanon.

Academic Degrees


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